Amazon Prime's latest perk is a dedicated anime channel

Get Anime Strike for $5/month

Amazon Prime Video may have made its name on original series like Transparent, Mozart in the Jungle, and Man in the High Castle, but the e-market powerhouse has had little for anime fans to enjoy - until now.

Amazon has unveiled Anime Strike for its Prime Video service, allowing viewers to stream contemporary anime series and movies - alongside a few classics like Ouran High School Host Club and Akira - right to their favorite devices for an extra $4.99 a month.

The 'extra' there is key. Anime Strike operates through Amazon Channels - Prime Video's series of add-on premium networks like Showtime, HBO and Starz - meaning that interested anime watchers will need to also be Amazon Prime subscribers to access the channel. 

An Amazon Prime membership starts at $10.99 a month (or $99 a year) though those interesting in just the streaming perks can subscribe to a standalone Prime Video membership for $8.99 a month.

Anime Strike's selection, though a bit on the thin end at the time of writing, is expected to expand and refresh on a weekly basis, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Nibbling at Crunchyroll?

Five bucks on top of an already perk-stuffed service like Prime isn't too bad a deal, especially considering Anime Strike plans to run ongoing series like Scum's Wish and Blue Exorcist: Kyoto Saga as soon as they air in Japan - a feature many on-the-pulse fans will appreciate. 

That said, Strike has its work cut out for it. Internet-savvy fans of Japanese animation tired of importing old DVDs are likely already subscribers to Crunchyroll - the reigning big dog in anime streaming.

Crunchyroll's premium subscription offers unlimited anime viewing for just $6.95 a month, though curious folks can still try the newest Amazon Channel free for seven days. (We regret to report that we couldn't find Dragon Ball Super or One-Punch Man anywhere but hey, Paprika is still really good!)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Parker Wilhelm is a freelance writer for TechRadar. He likes to tinker in Photoshop and talk people's ears off about how great Persona 4 is.