Movie business to take games more seriously

Are videogame/movie tie-ins about to get a whole lot better?

Rubbish tie-in games churned out to coincide with the latest blockbuster movie fill the shelves of our local gaming emporiums, but their days may soon be over as Ulf Andersson, co-founder of games developer GRIN, revealed recently.

Andersson spoke to GamesIndustry.biz about the upcoming Terminator: Salvation game and his comments unveiled something of a sea change in the way both the game and movie industries are approaching tie-ins.

"They had to change their culture to be able to produce games," he explained.

"Movie productions are pretty secretive about their stuff, so depending on how the production looks that can of course impact on development a lot."

Taking games more seriously

He continued: "I think the movie business is taking games more seriously.

"I know that there are movies planned where the game is planned into it - the audiences are starting to join together. Those going to see the movie and those buying the game have begun to meld together."

Does this mean that we won't see the likes of another Iron Man game, which averages a 40 per cent mark on Metacritic, again?

Probably not, but it does show that more thought is being put into how games of movies are made – which is just as well because recent reports show that the game market is more lucrative than the movie market, a trend set to continue in 2009.

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Marc (Twitter, Google+) is the content team lead for Future Technology, where he is in charge of a 14-strong team of journalists who write many of the wonderful stories that end up on TechRadar, T3.com and T3 magazine. Prior to this he was deputy editor of TechRadar, had a 10-month stint editing a weekly iPad magazine, written film reviews for a whole host of publications and has been an integral part of many magazines that are no longer with us.