When the iPad finally arrives in the UK later this spring, the one thing that will make or break its success with British consumers will be the perceived value of the applications on offer.

After all, this is an entirely new type of computing device for the vast majority of consumers, many of whom are both intrigued by the concept yet still asking the question: "But what will I actually do with it?"

The latest reports from the US suggest that the iPad's apps are going to be bigger in size and costlier than their iPhone counterparts.

Why people buy iPhones

"The reason why people buy an iPhone is because there are 140,000 apps and you can change your iPhone into anything you want," noted Gene Munster, a senior research analyst at Piper Jaffray.

According to Munster and other industry analysts, iPad apps are going to be more expensive – averaging around $4 (£2.50) per app instead of the average of $1.90 £1.20) for iPhone apps.

Travis Boatman, VP of game giant Electronic Arts, noted at the iPad launch that the experience was "a little bit like holding a hi-def television just inches from your face."

We all await to see what developers create for the iPad after the device hits the shelves this spring – and hope to be pleasantly surprised by the new books, games, work productivity apps, shopping apps and more which will no doubt arrive in a flurry through the spring and summer as developers hope for a new app gold rush.

Bob O'Donnell, VP of research firm IDG, expects about 3 to 4 million slate computers to be sold in 2010.

Via CNN.com