Hopefully that should mean your battery is always charged for powering all the latest car tech, while lasting longer and needing less servicing.

10 tech features to adore in the 2012 Ford Fiesta

9. Auto-City-Stop

Ford has brought something associated with much higher-range cars to the supermini. Auto-city-stop scans the road 15m ahead 50 times per second, using light and range-detection sensors to spot possible collisions with cars.

If it works out that you're not going to react to a stationary, or slowing car, the Fiesta will slam on the brakes, flash your hazard lights, and disconnect the engine.

It should prevent collisions at up to 15kph (10mph), stopping the car roughly 30 centimetres from the object in question, and aims to significantly reduce the impact velocity of accidents at up to 30kph (19mph).

Unfortunately, above that speed the system won't help you, because it's camera-based and not radar-based like more sophisticated systems found on some Volvos and other cars. But it should still help those not paying enough attention in stop-start traffic.

10 tech features to adore in the 2012 Ford Fiesta

10. Hill launch assist

Not everyone's skilled when it comes to hill starts. Finding the biting point of the clutch, the right amount of revs, and using the hand brake at the same time can be quite taxing.

Ford's decided to try to make your hill-climbing life a little easier with hill launch assist, which automatically applies the brakes with enough force to prevent the car from rolling backwards or forwards.

Once you apply enough force from the engine to support the weight of the car, the brakes automatically disengage, whether you're in first gear or reverse. It basically turns a manual car into an automatic, holding your position on any sort of uphill gradient.

In the end, the new Ford Fiesta packs more tech that you'd normally associate with larger, more premium cars than ever before, and into a neat and tidy little package. The small car has finally grown up.