Naim Audio's tiny Mu-so Qb is a miniature audio powerhouse

The successor to Naim's much-loved Mu-so has been announced

High-end sonic heavyweight, Naim Audio, has just announced the Mu-so Qb, the successor to the hugely popular Mu-so wireless player.

Combining the same attention to detail, and the same audio heritage as its progenitor, the new Mu-so Qb is packing a serious amount of audio power into an impressively small, cuboid chassis.

There's a full 300W of amplification in that 21cm cube, with a pair of 50W tweeters and another two 50W mid-range speakers offering the detail, plus a further 100W subwoofer delivering the depth of sound.

Working in conjunction with that sub are a pair of bass radiators on either side of the Mu-so Qb to really hammer home low-end frequencies.

Hi-res audio

The new Mu-so Qb is also using the same 32-bit digital signal processor (DSP) as its forebear, allowing it to support the sort of high-resolution audio you'd expect from such a high-end wireless music system.

Naim Mu so Qb

And when we're talking high-end we're talking glass-reinforced polymer used in the cabinet itself, and anodised aluminium in the lid and in the heatsink along the rear. Yes, it's got a heatsink. All that aural power in such a tiny box can make for a whole lot of heat.

As a wireless audio system the Naim Mu-so Qb is capable of getting in on the multiroom action too. Via the Naim App (available on either iOS or Android stores) you can link up to five Naim products together, whether they're more Qbs, the original Mu-so or a full Naim Uniti system.

Naim Mu so Qb

There's Bluetooth AptX support to get CD-quality music streamed from Tidal and Spotify Connect support too. It will also happily make your hi-res audio library sound great, with the ability to play FLAC and WAV files up to 192kHz/24-bit and ALAC files at 96kHz/24-bit.

The tiny Naim Mu-so Qb is going to go on sale in March this year with a price tag of $999.95 (£595). So start saving, people.

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