Bowers and Wilkins unleashes its first wireless headset

Serious sound with no strings attached

Bowers and Wilkins has just lifted the lid on its first ever wireless headset.

The new P5 Wireless goes on sale today and uses the same high-end audio tech that made the wires P5 Series 2 sound so good, but now comes with the convenience of Bluetooth wireless.

So, why has it taken B&W so long to get into the Bluetooth headset game? It's all about sound quality and reliability.

"We very much set out, as we always do, to make sure it sounds great, to be a great-sounding experience for everyone," explained Shaun Marin, Brand Manager at B&W. "Bluetooth aptX was, we felt, a real step forward to allow people a universally good experience."

The new, subtly understated, P5 Wireless contains the exact same advanced 40mm drive units it used to power the original P5 Series 2 - packing the same huge 10Hz - 20kHz frequency range - which in itself was a technical challenge.

P5 Wireless

But even though the new set needs to pack in a battery to power the wireless connectivity there's barely any change to the design.

They're maybe a millimetre or so thicker and only 18g heavier. But that's also not taking into account the weight of the wired headset's cable…

With 17hrs playback (at around 80% volume) the P5 Wireless will deliver its signature sound practically all day without needing to be plugged in. But if you do forget to charge you can plug a cable in to keep on going.

As a Bluetooth headset the new cans also come with a microphone and voice-boosting tech too for when you get that awkward call interrupting your musical flow.

There is a pretty hefty price premium on this audiophile wireless connectivity though. The P5 Series 2 are currently available for £200 in the UK while this new Bluetooth version is a steep £330 at launch today.

But if you want the no compromise Bluetooth sound though you might well be willing to pay. We've had a listen and the sound is superb.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Components Editor

Dave (Twitter) is the components editor for TechRadar and has been professionally testing, tweaking, overclocking and b0rking all kinds of computer-related gubbins since 2006. Dave is also an avid gamer, with a love of Football Manager that borders on the obsessive. Dave is also the deputy editor of TechRadar's older sibling, PC Format.