Running the show is the latest third-gen Core i7 3610QM processor, clocked at 2.3GHz.

Intel's chipset does a pretty decent job with HD media anyway, but Medion has decided to chuck in an NVIDIA GeForce GT 630m GPU, which actually turns this affordable laptop into a pretty decent machine for design work or gaming.

While the 4GB RAM isn't anything to get excited about, the fact that there's an extra RAM slot for user-upgradeable memory is a nice touch, and allows the cost to stay nice and low.

The 750GB hard drive is a nice balance between capacity and affordability. It's only a 5400rpm hard drive, so it's not the fastest storage option on the market, but it comes down to that ever-important balance between cost and function, which Medion seems to have done well.

Touch sensitive media controls grace the top of the P6635's keyboard, although like most touch sensitive buttons they can be a little unreliable at times. The touchpad also blends into the body, with only the slightest tactile difference between the pad and the palm rest, which can be a little disconcerting to use at first, although ultimately feels good over time.

The keyboard itself is a full sized version featuring chiclet keys, which are pleasantly responsive. There's no backlighting, but that's hardly a dealbreaker.

Despite the Dolby Home Theatre sticker on the palm rest, the Akoya's speakers sound a little bit tinny, especially at higher volume, although are more than capable of keeping you entertained at the office. The 15.6-inch, 1366 x 768 resolution screen is nice enough, although struggles with off-centre viewing angles, which is probably to be expected for the price.

Running down the sides of the laptop, you get two USB 3.0 ports, an HDMI output, 15-pin VGA and an ethernet port on the left hand side, while the right hand side houses the power, DVD drive, two USB 2.0 ports, as well as dedicated headphone and microphone jacks. An SD card slot sits at the front.

Internally, the Medion Akoya P6635 has all the standard wireless offerings, from 802.11 b/g/n to Bluetooth 4.0, as well as supporting Intel's Wi-Di standard for beaming your screen to a compatible television (not that you can get any of those yet).

The 1.3-megapixel webcam is never going to change the world, but it does the job for when you need to Skype someone. You probably wouldn't want to record a YouTube video on it though, unless you were desperate.